Anyone recognize this doorway? Anyone?

Savannah Doorway #101

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I’ve been thinking a lot lately about finding new locations in which to shoot; not only new locations in which to shoot nudes, but new locations in general. I’ve wanted to move the nude work out-of-doors for some time now, as I’ve written about in past blog posts, but more than that, I want to see something new.

As I was preparing this post, and looking through recent and not so recent model sessions for an image to include, I came across a grouping of long ignored sub folders in one primary folder simply titled “Unused.”  This was very intriguing.

With some trepidation, I clicked on the folder and began looking through the sub folders, a few of which bore one word titles such as “Test” or nothing but a numeric code. The number codes seemed random at first, but they are the primary means by which I record my sessions. I clicked on one with the code 080104. This was a folder of images created on August 1, 2004.

Approximately 200 images filled the monitor before me. They were random shots of trees and houses, parks and street corners, empty warehouses and old store fronts. And doorways.

These were images from my first scouting expedition after my arrival in Savannah.  Up until that time, I had been working in Atlanta. Prior to Atlanta, I had worked in many different locations around the states, and in some countries abroad. After all, the landscape is everywhere and the landscape was my first and primary subject for many years.

But it was in Atlanta where my work with the figure took hold. Most of that work was shot in studio, and I felt that my relocation to Savannah would afford more opportunities to work out-of-doors, and I included the figure in those hopes. I went location scouting.

Until recently, I was not a good note taker. I was always able to rely on my memory. In truth, I’m still not a good note taker, but the advent of the smart phone has made the act of making an actual note less tedious. The vast majority of locations from that scouting walk-about are easily identifiable. But among the images are several shots of doorways: some are to private residences, some are entrances to courtyards, and some are to public buildings. And for some – I have no idea.

That’s the case for the doorway in this picture. The address is 101…someplace. I know it’s in Savannah, and I’m reasonably sure it’s in the historic district. I just don’t know where, and nothing – not the order of the image files or the metadata attached to this specific image file – is giving me an answer.

These are lovely old doors. I think they would make a stunning background for a nude figurative image. So, I’ll be scouting for them. But, if you recognize this doorway – and can redirect me to it – please, please, please get in touch!

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Other than looking for lost doorways, I’ve not a whole lot new to report. I’ve found a stash of well frozen Ilford XP2 film, so I’m planning on breaking out the Yashica TLR once again; perhaps the Holga too. I’ve been thinking of doing some street photography around the holidays for a change of pace. The Yashica and Holga could be good cameras for the project. XP2 is a black & white C-41 process film, so most any lab still developing color negative film can develop it.

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2 Responses to Anyone recognize this doorway? Anyone?

  1. Dave Rudin says:

    When I first read the title of the post, i thought that perhaps the doors were in the film version of “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” and you were testing us, but apparently that is not the case. it is frustrading when you know there’s a place you want to get back to but you don’t know where it is. It seems a bit like an archaeological artifact without proper provenance; it may be nice to look at, but if you don’t know exactly where it was found, it may be historically worthless. Good luck in finding it.

  2. Bill Ballard says:

    I do have a few shots of the Mercer House (the house made infamous by the “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” book/movie) and perhaps in a future post, I’ll include one of them. They were among my best sellers when I was a partner in City Market’s ‘The Gallery.’

    No, it’s not a test – it’s a confession of my own ineptness!

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